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Emerging tools for HIV surveillance (such as deep sequencing of virus with phylogenetic analysis, tests for recent acquisitions and mobile and mapping technologies) offer opportunities to better understand the epidemiology of HIV and efficiently focus public health interventions. However, they pose risks of identifying and blaming transmitters of HIV and of invading privacy and disclosing personal information. Maximizing the public health benefits of surveillance requires collection of social and behavioural data, along with biological samples, for both the individual and the community. In determining what is ethically acceptable, society will have to balance public health benefits and harms, ensure individual and community understanding and consent, and develop regulations to allow responsible and accountable surveillance using newly available tools and methods. Speakers in this session will review the opportunities and challenges posed by new surveillance methods and current thinking about their ethical use.

11:45
2 min
Introduction
Ruth LAIBON MASHA, National AIDS Control Council (NACC), Kenya
Charles HOLMES, Georgetown University, United States
11:47
8 min
The power of modern techniques in HIV surveillance
Christophe FRASER, Big Data Institute, United Kingdom
12:03
8 min
Ensuring individual- and community-informed consent for HIV surveillance
Peter GODFREY-FAUSSETT, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, United Kingdom
12:11
8 min
A community perspective on new surveillance methods
Yvette RAPHAEL, APHA, South Africa
12:19
26 min
Q&A
Ruth LAIBON MASHA, National AIDS Control Council (NACC), Kenya
Christophe FRASER, Big Data Institute, United Kingdom
Yvette RAPHAEL, APHA, South Africa
Peter GODFREY-FAUSSETT, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, United Kingdom
Charles HOLMES, Georgetown University, United States
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